Does Alimony End When a Divorce Is Final?

By Teo Spengler

Alimony is financial support one spouse pays to the other after separation. An alimony award can be temporary or permanent, depending on the state, the duration of the marriage, and the economic situations of the respective spouses. The obligation to pay alimony generally does not end with the divorce judgment.

Alimony is financial support one spouse pays to the other after separation. An alimony award can be temporary or permanent, depending on the state, the duration of the marriage, and the economic situations of the respective spouses. The obligation to pay alimony generally does not end with the divorce judgment.

Temporary Alimony

Courts have discretion to award alimony as part of a separation or divorce after taking into account relevant factors including the age, education and training of the spouses, their relative financial situations, and the duration of the marriage. If the marriage was relatively short, any alimony award is likely to be temporary, awarded for a set number of years to assist the lesser-earning spouse to establish herself in the work force.

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Permanent Alimony

Sometimes a divorce court awards permanent alimony, requiring one spouse to support the other financially for the rest of her life. State laws differ as to when this is appropriate. In states like California, courts have discretion to award spousal support for the indefinite future if the marriage lasted at least 10 years.

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Will He Still Have to Pay Alimony With a No Fault Divorce in Pennsylvania?

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Divorce Law in New Hampshire for Alimony

Following a divorce, alimony may be awarded to help a struggling spouse transition to single life, with the hope that both spouses will eventually secure an independent source of income. In New Hampshire, courts rarely award permanent alimony. In determining short-term alimony, the courts will consider the relative income of each party and each party's ability to make money.

How Long Do You Have to Be Married to Receive Spousal Support?

Spousal support, or alimony, refers to the payments made to one spouse by the other during a separation of after a divorce. It is based either on an agreement between the couple or by a determination of the court. The purpose of spousal support is to limit any unfair economic effects of the divorce to the receiving spouse who is typically a non-wage earner or the lower-wage earner of the two. For example, a spouse who left the workforce to raise the couple's children might need money to get job training that will help her support herself after the divorce. While the length of the marriage is a factor that courts consider before awarding spousal support, it is usually not the only consideration.

How to Figure Out Alimony Owed in the State of Ohio

Divorce can cause financial hardship to either spouse, particularly when one party earns significantly less than the other. To help bridge the gap between the spouses’ incomes and assist the lower-earning spouse to get on her feet financially, Ohio divorce courts can order alimony, or spousal support, to be paid by one spouse to the other in certain circumstances.

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