Can Divorce Proceedings in Arizona Be Stop by the Petitioner?

By Mary Jane Freeman

If you've already filed for divorce in Arizona, but the divorce has not yet been finalized, you can stop the proceedings. However, the requirements for stopping the divorce differ, depending on how far along you are in the process.

If you've already filed for divorce in Arizona, but the divorce has not yet been finalized, you can stop the proceedings. However, the requirements for stopping the divorce differ, depending on how far along you are in the process.

Stopping Your Divorce

In Arizona, divorce is known as dissolution of marriage. If the judge has not yet issued a signed Decree of Dissolution of Marriage in your case, you can stop the proceedings. If you've filed for divorce, but have not yet served your spouse with the papers, you can simply file a Notice of Dismissal with the court to stop the divorce action. If service has already been completed, you must file a Motion to Dismiss. If you are in the middle of divorce proceedings, and you and your spouse are in agreement about ending the divorce, you may file a Stipulation to Dismiss to terminate the proceedings.

Divorce is never easy, but we can help. Learn More
Divorce is never easy, but we can help. Learn More
Can You Back Out of Divorce If You Already Filed?

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