Can Phone Service Be Turned Off When Will Is in Probate?

By Teo Spengler

Filing a will in probate court does not prevent a service provider like a phone company from expecting prompt payment. Although few companies shut down home service the minute a customer misses a payment, it is within a phone company's rights to turn off service if a deceased customer's bills go unpaid.

Filing a will in probate court does not prevent a service provider like a phone company from expecting prompt payment. Although few companies shut down home service the minute a customer misses a payment, it is within a phone company's rights to turn off service if a deceased customer's bills go unpaid.

Phone Bills

Utility companies expect payment for services provided regardless of whether the client ordering the services is living or dead. This is not as unreasonable as it seems. Although the deceased won't be using the home telephone, others staying in or visiting the house might do so.

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Executor's Duties

Once the will of the deceased is filed in probate, an executor is appointed to administer the estate. Often the will names the executor, but if not, the court usually appoints a family member. The executor is charged with several duties, including paying estate bills, including telephone bills.

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What Happens When an Executor of a Will Doesn't Carry Out What the Will Asks For?

References

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If a spouse wishes to file a divorce, the first step will be the filing of the petition in a proper court of law. Simple divorce petitions generally state that the spouses have irreconcilable differences, and thus the wording does not blame one party or the other. However, in highly contested divorces, attorneys will strategically write the petition for divorce to include particular reasons why the divorce has been filed. Sometimes, the other spouse will want to fight or contest those listed reasons. Similarly, a spouse may also wish to contest the relief ultimately sought in the divorce.

Can a Non Lawyer Probate a Will?

The probate process usually does two things: it checks the validity of a will, and makes sure the instructions in the will are followed correctly. The executor of the estate is usually involved in both processes. While you can file a will for probate and serve as executor without being an attorney, you may find an attorney's advice helpful, especially if an estate is large or there's a will contest involved.

Executor Duties & Rights in Handling a Will

The executor is the person responsible for carrying out the instructions left in a will. The executor may be named in the will itself or may be appointed by the probate court. In order to fulfill duties as executor, the executor has certain rights. These rights are bestowed by the probate court in a document known as letters testamentary, which the executor usually petitions for when the will is filed with the court.

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