How to Change a Legal Name in Oregon

by Anna Assad
    Make sure you submit all the forms necessary.

    Make sure you submit all the forms necessary.

    Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images

    You can change your legal name in Oregon for various reasons, as long as you're not doing so to commit fraud or hide from court actions or financial obligations. Name change proceedings are conducted in the probate or county circuit court of the Oregon county where you reside. Oregon has numerous filing requirements for a legal name change, and you must submit all the forms in order to change your name.

    Step 1

    Obtain the name change forms you need. Some counties offer the forms at the courthouse, whereas others require you to provide your own forms. Visit a legal publishing company or office supply store to get the forms you need: Petition for Change of Name; Notice of Change of Name Hearing; Affidavit--Proof of Posting Notice of Hearing; Affidavit--Proof of Posting Notice of Name Change; Change of Name Decree; and Notice of Change of Name Decree.

    Step 2

    Enter the required information on the Petition for Change of Name. You need to enter your present and proposed names on the spaces provided. Don't sign the petition yet; you must have your signature notarized.

    Step 3

    Fill out the Notice of Change of Name Hearing form. You need the present and proposed names. Forms vary slightly by county. Contact your county to ask what days and times name-change hearings are held. You pick your hearing date by entering the date on the notice, and it has to be at least 14 days after the day you're filing the notice and petition in court. The notice must be on display for at least 14 days. Make at least two copies of the finished form.

    Step 4

    File the petition and Notice of Change of Name Hearing form in court. Sign the petition and have the court clerk notarize your signature. Pay the filing fee, which varies by county. Take a notice copy and post the paper in the courthouse. Ask the clerk where legal notices are posted in the building if you're not sure.

    Step 5

    Complete the Affidavit--Proof of Posting Notice of Hearing. Don't sign the document. You must sign the document in front of the court clerk for notarization. Attach a copy of the Notice of Change of Name Hearing form to the Proof of Posting Notice of Hearing affidavit.

    Step 6

    Complete the Change of Name Decree. Don't sign or date the decree; the judge must sign and date the decree.

    Step 7

    Visit the court clerk on the day of the hearing. Bring the Change of Name Decree, Notice of Change of Name Decree and the Proof of Posting Notice of Hearing affidavit with you. Ask the clerk to notarize the Proof of Posting Notice of Hearing affidavit. Take both documents to the hearing; the judge signs the decree at the hearing. After the hearing, take the documents the judge returns to you.

    Step 8

    File the documents the judge gave you in the court clerk's office. Complete the Notice of Change of Name Decree. Make at least two copies. Post the Notice of Change of Name Decree in the area of the courthouse for public notices. Wait 14 days.

    Step 9

    Complete the Affidavit--Proof of Posting Notice of Name Change. Attach a copy of the Notice of Change of Name Decree. Don't sign the affidavit.

    Step 10

    Go to the court clerk's office. Bring the Proof of Posting Notice of Name Change affidavit. Have the clerk notarize the document after you sign. File the affidavit in the court clerk's office.

    Things Needed

    • Photo identification
    • Filing fee payment

    Tips & Warnings

    • Bring photo identification, such as a valid driver's license or U.S. passport, with you each time you go to court. Contact the court if you're not sure whether you have acceptable photo identification.
    • You must file the Proof of Posting Notice of Name Change affidavit with the court to finalize the name change.

    About the Author

    Anna Assad began writing professionally in 1999 and has published several legal articles for various websites. She has an extensive real estate and criminal legal background. She also tutored in English for nearly eight years, attended Buffalo State College for paralegal studies and accounting, and minored in English literature, receiving a Bachelor of Arts.

    Photo Credits

    • Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images