How to Copyright a Drawing

By Robin Elizabeth Margolis

Under current U.S. copyright law, your drawing is automatically protected from the moment that you created it. You are not legally required to formally copyright it. The U.S. Copyright Office recommends that you obtain a certificate of copyright registration for your drawing to receive additional legal protections, including a public record of your copyright claim.

Under current U.S. copyright law, your drawing is automatically protected from the moment that you created it. You are not legally required to formally copyright it. The U.S. Copyright Office recommends that you obtain a certificate of copyright registration for your drawing to receive additional legal protections, including a public record of your copyright claim.

Registering Online

Step 1

Review a U.S. Copyright Office brochure titled "Copyright Registration for Works of the Visual Arts."

Protect against infringement by registering a copyright. Get Started Now

Step 2

Visit the U.S. Copyright Office website. Click on a link titled "Electronic Copyright Office." On the next page, click on a link titled "eCO Tutorial." Read the tutorial to learn each step in the online copyright application process.

Step 3

Return to the home page of the U.S. Copyright Office website. Click on a link titled, "eCO Login." Follow the interactive screens' directives to set up your online copyright application account. You will be charged an application fee, $35 at the time of publication.

Step 4

Print out a shipping slip for a copy of your drawing that you will be sending by postal mail to the U.S. Copyright Office.

Step 5

Make a photocopy of your drawing that will be linked with your electronic application. The photocopy colors should match those in the drawing. If your drawing is unpublished, prepare one photocopy. If your drawing is published, make two copies. The Copyright Office prefers that the copies of your drawing display its entire content in an 8-inch by 10-inch format.

Step 6

Fill out the shipping slip and attach it to the packaged photocopy of your drawing. Send the photocopy of your drawing to the Copyright Office address shown on the shipping slip within 30 days after registering the drawing's copyright online. Place the photocopy and the shipping slip in a box instead of an envelope to insure that the photocopy survives the current mail security irradiation process.

Step 7

Contact the Copyright Office if you do not receive your drawing's certificate of registration within three months.

Registering by Postal Mail

Step 1

Review a U.S. Copyright Office brochure titled "Copyright Registration for Works of the Visual Arts."

Step 2

Visit the U.S. Copyright Office website. Click on a link titled "Forms." Scroll down the next page and download a copy of Form CO and its instructions. Print out Form CO, "Application for Copyright Registration," and fill it out.

Step 3

Make a photocopy of your drawing that will accompany your Form CO. The photocopy colors should match those in the drawing. If your drawing is unpublished, prepare one photocopy. If your drawing is published, make two copies. The Copyright Office prefers that the copies of your drawing display its entire content in an 8-inch by 10-inch format.

Step 4

Place Form CO, a photocopy of your drawing, and a check for $50 made out to the "Register of Copyrights" in a box instead of an envelope to ensure that the photocopy survives the current mail security irradiation process.

Step 5

Send the box to: Library of Congress, Copyright Office, 101 Independence Avenue, SE, Washington, DC 20559-6211.

Step 6

Contact the Copyright Office if you do not receive a certificate of registration for your drawing within 10 months.

Protect against infringement by registering a copyright. Get Started Now
How to Copyright a CD

References

Related articles

How to Copyright Choreography

A copyright affords protection to creators and owners of unique intellectual property that is fixed in some permanent, tangible form such as a written notation, book, video, sound recording, or drawing. To be eligible for copyright protection, your choreography must be original. Under U.S. copyright law, as soon as an original work of authorship, such as choreography, has been created in fixed form, then copyright protection exists from that time. This gives the author or his agent to rightfully claim copyright. However, it is much better to register the copyright, because it creates a public notice that you own the rights and enables you to sue in federal court if someone uses your choreography without your permission. It is important to note that choreography that has not been made into a fixed form is not eligible for copyright protection.

How to Copyright a Documentary

Copyright is a form of protection that is available for original works of authorship fixed in a tangible medium of expression. Your documentary film is entitled to automatic copyright protection from the moment it is recorded; however, you also have the option to formally register the work. Registration is beneficial because it creates a public record and allows you to recover monetary damages in the event that someone infringes on your documentary film. You can register in three ways: online through the U.S. Copyright Office, online using a document preparation and filing service such as LegalZoom.com or by mailing in paper forms.

How to Copyright a Webpage

Your webpage is technically copyrighted as soon as it is placed in a tangible medium such as the Internet. In order to further protect your website you should consider registering for a formal copyright so that you will have the ability to sue any third parties that might misuse your materials. Copyrighting your webpage is not a difficult task, but copyright protection will only extend to certain aspects of your webpage, such as writings, artwork and photographs. A copyright will not protect your domain name, any functional aspects of your website, or any elements of your website that are common or otherwise part of the public domain.

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