How to File a Divorce Disclosure Statement

By Michael Butler

Before a divorce is finalized, most states require the parties to file a disclosure statement, which sets out their assets and liabilities. These statements give the court information about the finances of the parties and assist the court in reaching an equitable division of property. Because divorce is a matter of state law, the process varies slightly among states. However, it is substantially similar in all states. You should familiarize yourself with the laws in your state.

Before a divorce is finalized, most states require the parties to file a disclosure statement, which sets out their assets and liabilities. These statements give the court information about the finances of the parties and assist the court in reaching an equitable division of property. Because divorce is a matter of state law, the process varies slightly among states. However, it is substantially similar in all states. You should familiarize yourself with the laws in your state.

Step 1

Obtain a divorce disclosure statement for your state. You might find one on a state or local court website. You can also obtain one from an online legal document preparation website.

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Step 2

Read the form to learn what you need to disclose. Usually, you need to disclose all income, debts and assets.

Step 3

Gather all documents that need to be filed with the disclosure statement, such as tax returns, bank statements and recurring bills. These documents will also contain the information you need to fill out the form.

Step 4

Complete and sign the form. Depending on your state, you made need to have the form notarized.

Step 5

File the disclosure statement with the clerk of the court handling the divorce.

Step 6

Serve a copy of the form on your spouse.

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How to File Property Declaration in a Divorce in California

References

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The Legal Rights on Disclosure of Information in a Divorce

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Giving someone power of attorney over you or your affairs requires that you trust that person completely. A power of attorney allows him to legally act in your stead and make decisions for you. Many states automatically sever the power-of-attorney relationship between spouses in the event of a divorce. As long as you remain mentally competent, you can cancel a general POA yourself at any time.

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