How to File a Trial Brief for Divorce

By Michael Butler

Filing a divorce trial brief is different in different states and different counties within each state. This is because different courts have different rules about what must be in the trial brief. The state itself might have specific rules and local courts can expand upon those rules. In general, the trial brief is the documentation you file with the court to notify the court and other party of the relevant information you will bring forth at the divorce trial.

Filing a divorce trial brief is different in different states and different counties within each state. This is because different courts have different rules about what must be in the trial brief. The state itself might have specific rules and local courts can expand upon those rules. In general, the trial brief is the documentation you file with the court to notify the court and other party of the relevant information you will bring forth at the divorce trial.

Step 1

Research the court rules and procedures in your state. The state rules are usually located in the Divorce and Annulment section of your state's statutes.

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Step 2

Ask the Clerk of the Court for a copy of any local court rules. These are the rules set forth by the individual court.

Step 3

Gather all of the documents in both the state rules and local rules. The exact documents will vary depending on your location. You may need to file financial statements, exhibits, witness lists and a statement of how you want the court to rule. When all the documentation is in one place, you have your trial brief.

Step 4

File the trial brief by presenting it to the Clerk of the Court. Send a certified copy to the other party or her attorney if she is represented.

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References

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