How to Identify Officers in an LLC

by Terry Masters
LLC officers are commonly known as managers or member-managers.

LLC officers are commonly known as managers or member-managers.

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A limited liability company, or LLC, does not have officers in the same way as a corporation. A corporation's officers are defined by law and tradition. An LLC is structured like a partnership and has its own nomenclature for its management. LLC owners are referred to as members, and the people who manage the company's day-to-day operations are either called member-managers or managers. An LLC may, however, adopt a different titling system for its managers, calling them "officers" instead; however, if you are trying to find the parties responsible for an LLC, it is often helpful to know the technical language.

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Step 1

Check the state's business entity database. Most states maintain a database of business registrations, usually available through the website of the state office that accepts formative filings, like articles of incorporation or articles of organization. Typically, this is the business division of the secretary of state's office. Most states request that an LLC indicate in its articles of organization whether it will be member-managed or will hire outside management, and many further request names and addresses. Conduct a name search in the database and view the information available for the LLC. If the articles state that the LLC employs managers, these are analogous to the officers of the company. If the articles indicate the LLC is member-managed, then the members, or owners, are the officers of the company.

Step 2

Contact the company's registered agent. An LLC must have the name and address of a registered agent available to the public. If the information in the state business entity database doesn't indicate the names and addresses of members or managers of the company, call the registered agent. The agent is required by law to provide you with enough information to properly contact the people responsible for the LLC.

Step 3

Contact the business directly. Call any phone number provided by the registered agent and request the information. You can also check the LLC's website, if one exists. Companies often list officers and other important employees there.