How to Incorporate Doctors

By Thomas King

Incorporation refers to the process of forming a corporation. While some states allow doctors to form limited liability partnerships and limited liability companies, the only form of incorporation available to doctors is through a professional corporation. The steps required to form a professional corporation are governed by state law; however, the process is generally very similar among states.

Incorporation refers to the process of forming a corporation. While some states allow doctors to form limited liability partnerships and limited liability companies, the only form of incorporation available to doctors is through a professional corporation. The steps required to form a professional corporation are governed by state law; however, the process is generally very similar among states.

Step 1

Determine the name of your professional corporation. The name must be distinguishable from all other entities in your state and must include the denomination "professional service corporation," "professional corporation," or "PC" after the name. To determine the availability of a name, contact your state's secretary of state or use the business entity search engine on your secretary of state's homepage.

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Step 2

Go to the secretary of state's homepage for your home state or the state where you would like to form the corporation. Locate the Articles of Incorporation form (sometimes called Certificate of Corporation or Charter) and print it.

Step 3

Fill out the form using a black ink pen. The form will require certain basic information about the corporation, such as the corporate name, the number of shares that the corporation is authorized to issue, the name and address of the incorporator, the name and address of the registered agent, and the location of the main office. Note that many states require that you attach to the article of incorporation a copy of certification from the appropriate state licensing board showing that the members of your professional corporation are licensed to practice the profession for which the corporation is being organized. Contact your state licensing board for specific requirements.

Step 4

Write a check for the fee amount (generally listed on the form) and attach the check to the form. If the fee is not listed on the form, contact your secretary of state.

Step 5

Send the completed form and check to the address listed on the form. This is generally the office of the secretary or state.

Step 6

Register your professional corporation with the appropriate state licensing board (note that in some states, such as North Carolina, this must be done prior to filing the articles of incorporation). Each state has a different procedure. But generally, this amounts to sending a copy of the articles of incorporation certified by the secretary of state to the appropriate state licensing board.

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