Laws on Child Support Arrears in Nevada

By Heather Frances J.D.

Nevada’s laws on child support payments, including arrearages, are covered in Chapters 125B and 130 of Nevada Revised Statutes. While state agencies are available to help, you may wish to consult with an attorney if you have questions about how these laws apply to your specific situation.

Nevada’s laws on child support payments, including arrearages, are covered in Chapters 125B and 130 of Nevada Revised Statutes. While state agencies are available to help, you may wish to consult with an attorney if you have questions about how these laws apply to your specific situation.

Child Support Orders

Nevada law only allows a custodial parent to collect child support arrears from a non-custodial parent when there is a court order requiring child support payments. If there is no court-ordered child support in your case, you will not be able to collect back child support unless you first get a court order. A Nevada court may order the non-custodial parent to pay up to four years of back child support, as well as future support, even if there was no previous court order in place.

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Child Support Enforcement

Nevada’s Department of Health and Human Services administers Nevada’s Child Support Enforcement Program, which is designed to make child support more reliable; thereby, increasing families’ self-sufficiency. The Child Support Enforcement Program provides many services, including assistance in locating non-custodial parents, establishing and enforcing support orders, establishing paternity and collecting child support payments.

Collecting Overdue Payments

Nevada law allows collection of child support arrears from various sources. For example, child support payments can be withheld from paychecks, unemployment benefits and tax refunds. Additionally, child support liens may be placed on the non-custodial parent’s bank accounts and real property. Nevada law also allows suspension of the non-custodial parent’s driver’s license, professional licenses or U.S. passport for failing to pay past due support.

Collections Across State Lines

Nevada has adopted the Interstate Family Support Act, included in Chapter 130 of Nevada Revised Statutes, to govern child support collections across state lines. When Nevada’s support enforcement agency receives a request from the support enforcement agency of another state, Nevada adopts that request as a certification of the past-due amount owed in the other state. Nevada may then provide child support collection assistance to the other state or to the custodial parent.

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Alabama Child Support Arrears Laws

References

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What Happens When You Don't Pay Child Support in Illinois?

Every child has a right to receive care and support from her parents, and this parental responsibility doesn't end simply because a relationship or marriage ends. In Illinois, a non-custodial parent must financially contribute to the upbringing of his child by providing child support to the custodial parent. If he fails to do so, the custodial parent may seek help from Illinois' Division of Child Support Services, which pursues several remedies, including wage garnishment, property liens, revocation of licenses, interception of tax refunds and criminal prosecution.

How Are Child Support Arrears Assessed?

Child support "arrears" are amounts that came due and, for whatever reason, weren't paid. They may consist of missed payments or come from payments awarded for a time period prior to the initial establishment of the obligation. They can also include sums for child-related expenses, such as doctor co-pays, medicine or school costs. Although child support laws vary from state to state, arrears tend to be dealt with in a similar manner across the board.

Laws Concerning Back Child Support in Indiana

When unmarried, separated or divorced couples have children together, financial issues often become a source of stress or confusion. If the parent paying child support in Indiana — generally, the non-custodial parent — fails to pay or falls behind on payments, the custodial parent may need to pursue enforcement. Although parents can choose to make an informal financial arrangement, a court order increases the number of legal options available.

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