A Lawyer's Responsibility to a Client in a Divorce

By Jennifer Williams

Divorce can be terrifying, and it doesn't help that you're putting your case in the hands of a professional you've just hired, an attorney you likely don't know past your initial consultation. It may help to know that divorce attorneys have responsibilities to their clients, which are explained in the state's code of professional responsibility. And, an attorney's continued right to practice law depends on fulfilling these responsibilities to the letter.

Divorce can be terrifying, and it doesn't help that you're putting your case in the hands of a professional you've just hired, an attorney you likely don't know past your initial consultation. It may help to know that divorce attorneys have responsibilities to their clients, which are explained in the state's code of professional responsibility. And, an attorney's continued right to practice law depends on fulfilling these responsibilities to the letter.

Conflict of Interest

One of the first things a divorce attorney may ask for is your spouse's identity. He does this to verify that your spouse hasn't already consulted him. If he has, he'll politely tell you that he can't speak with you further. Likewise, if your spouse comes to him for a consultation after you've already hired him, the attorney will decline to speak with him. Attorneys are not allowed to represent both spouses in a divorce except in very limited circumstances that involve both spouses' written consent. And even then, most attorneys decline to do so. It should help you feel more secure in your relationship with your attorney to know that his loyalty is to you alone; your spouse, no matter how persuasive, can do nothing to disturb that loyalty.

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Confidentiality Agreement

Attorney-client privilege starts when you sign a retainer agreement hiring an attorney, and lasts indefinitely. With few exceptions, your divorce attorney is legally required to keep your information confidential. He can't repeat to anyone what you've told him in the course of your case unless you discuss it first. The privilege covers the attorney's staff, so you may discuss private matters in front of them without waiving the privilege. An exception to this rule is if you sue the attorney for malpractice, your attorney can testify against you and discuss otherwise privileged information while on the stand. He also can turn you over to the authorities if you threaten to kill or seriously hurt someone. Some states, such as California, also allow attorneys to turn you in if you seek their help to commit fraud.

Zealous Representation

Your divorce attorney has responsibility to represent you zealously, which means he must do everything within his power, within the bounds of ethics and the law, to represent your case and work toward your desired outcome. This, however, doesn't mean crushing your spouse or employing unlawful means to get information to use against him.

Open Communication

Your lawyer has a responsibility to communicate with you through the various phases of your divorce. Some attorneys fulfill this responsibility by sending you copies of all documents filed on your behalf and received from your spouses attorney that have been filed on his behalf. Your attorney also must present to you any offers of settlement that he considers reasonable, so that you may make the final decision of acceptance or rejection.

Financial Responsibilities

All attorneys, no matter their area of practice, cannot charge exorbitant fees. Exorbitant is decided within the context of the type of law involved and the complexity of the case. In addition, the attorney's fee structure must be clearly defined and should be presented to you in writing. This is usually taken care of in the compensation section of the attorney retainer agreement. A divorce attorney specifically is bound by an additional requirement. In family law cases, he may not require or agree to a contingency fee arrangement, where payment of his fee requires he first secure your divorce, or some specific outcome in the divorce settlement.

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What Does a Divorce Attorney Do?

References

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What to Expect in Your Final Divorce Hearing on Your Trial Day in South Carolina

South Carolina encourages spouses to reach an agreement on the terms of their divorce, such as property division and child custody, but you and your spouse may not be able to mutually agree on all terms. If your settlement negotiations fail, it will be up to the court to make these decisions for you based on evidence it receives from your filed paperwork and during the divorce trial. The court cannot consider evidence unless it’s properly presented, so it is important to understand the trial process.

Subpoenaing Witnesses for a Divorce Trial

A successful divorce trial is the result of gathering and documenting information. If you and your spouse cannot reach a settlement and a trial becomes inevitable, you will probably want to seek the assistance of an attorney, rather than proceed on your own. Your attorney will first attempt to identify facts that will support your case through discovery methods. These might include issuing interrogatories, which are written questions your spouse must answer under oath. Then your attorney must bring these facts to the attention of the judge. One way to accomplish the latter is to subpoena the person who holds the information, legally obligating them to give testimony.

What to Expect From an Opposing Divorce Lawyer

Dealing with your spouse's attorney can be daunting, but it's his job to represent your spouse to the best of his ability. If you're represented by your own counsel, your personal contact with opposing counsel should be limited. If you're representing yourself, however, you'll be handling all communication about the case yourself. Represented or not, you should know there are some professional rules of conduct opposing counsel has to follow that may make facing down your spouse's lawyer a little easier.

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