What Is the Minimum Child Support in Texas?

By Beverly Bird

Child support depends on a number of factors – your income, how many children you have, and your state's method of calculation. If you have children, you likely can't get a divorce without a corresponding child support obligation, and all these factors are integral to how much you'll pay.

Child support depends on a number of factors – your income, how many children you have, and your state's method of calculation. If you have children, you likely can't get a divorce without a corresponding child support obligation, and all these factors are integral to how much you'll pay.

Child Support Guidelines

Texas uses the percentage of obligor's income formula for calculating child support. Obligations are based on the non-custodial parent's income; they don’t factor in what the custodial parent earns. Child support is a set percentage of your net income, based on the number of children you must support. Therefore, the minimum amount would apply if you have only one child, and the percentage of your income increases with each additional child.

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Your Net Income

In Texas, child support is based on what you take home each pay period, not what you earn before the government and other responsibilities take a bite. You can deduct Social Security taxes, federal and state income taxes, health insurance premiums you pay for your child, and union dues. Your minimum support obligation depends on how many of these allowable deductions you qualify for that lower your net pay.

Other Dependents

If you were married before and you owe child support for children from that marriage, this lowers your child support percentage. If you're supporting one child from that marriage, and if you have one child from this marriage, the percentage of your income will drop.

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Texas Family Code Child Support Guidelines

References

Related articles

What Percentage of Income Does Child Support Take for One Kid?

Each state's laws determine how much child support a non-custodial parent must pay after a divorce, and the rates and method of calculation vary between states. These payments are intended to pay for a child's normal expenses, such as housing, food, clothing and education. Though courts frequently use the guidelines to set child support amounts, courts do not have to follow them in cases where they would not be appropriate, such as when a child needs special medical care because of a disability.

The Child Support Obligation for a Non-Custodial Parent According to the Law in Illinois

Illinois is one of only 10 jurisdictions that still calculates child support the good, old-fashioned way, based only on the non-custodial parent's income. Along with eight other states and the District of Columbia, Illinois courts use the percentage of obligor's income formula for determining a non-custodial parent's obligation. This formula doesn't incorporate your spouse's earnings, but if you're divorcing and you think you'll be the non-custodial parent, it makes it relatively easy to understand what your obligation will be going forward.

Formulas to Determine Child Support in California

When a California couple with children divorces, the court determines how much child support the non-custodial parent should pay. Because California’s formula to calculate child support is so complicated, the courts depend on a computer program to calculate the actual amount, but parents are responsible for providing the information required for input into this program.

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