New Hampshire Law on Wedding Rings After Divorce

By Teo Spengler

In New Hampshire, a spouse can seek either a no-fault divorce or a divorce based on the other spouse's fault. In either case, the New Hampshire court divides all of the couple's property -- whether acquired before or during the marriage -- according to an "equitable and just" standard. This includes engagement and wedding rings.

In New Hampshire, a spouse can seek either a no-fault divorce or a divorce based on the other spouse's fault. In either case, the New Hampshire court divides all of the couple's property -- whether acquired before or during the marriage -- according to an "equitable and just" standard. This includes engagement and wedding rings.

Property Division

New Hampshire is not a community property state where each spouse has a 50 percent ownership in all marital property. Rather, the court is charged with dividing all of the property owned by both spouses equitably. This includes property the couple brought into the marriage, inheritances and gifts. The court is under no obligation to make the division equal, but must divide the entire estate according to the equities of the circumstances after considering such factors as the length of the marriage, the age and income of the spouses, and any fault established in the divorce.

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Engagement and Wedding Rings

In community property states, rings given before a marriage are sometimes considered the separate property of the person receiving the ring rather than property subject to division in a divorce. Some courts evaluate them as conditional gifts that become the absolute property of the receiving spouse upon marriage. In New Hampshire, however, divorce courts divide all of a couple's property in an equitable manner, not just the marital or community property. Thus the award of the rings depends on the total property owned by the spouses and the other factors set forth in the state's property division laws.

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North Carolina Considerations in Separation of Assets During a Divorce

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Shared Property Divorce Laws in Ohio

According to Ohio law, divorce is a civil lawsuit to end a marriage that occurs when the husband and wife cannot agree on how to resolve their problems; the court makes the final decisions concerning property division, spousal support and child custody. This differs from a dissolution of marriage, which, according to Ohio law, occurs when the parties mutually agree to terminate their marriage. Neither party has to prove grounds to end a marriage by dissolution. If spouses share property, they should understand the legal standard followed by the court when dividing their property in the event of a divorce. In Ohio, state laws use the term "marital property" when describing property to which both spouses may share rights.

What is the Division of Assets Divorce Law?

The sharing of property between spouses is a basic component of marriage. When the legal relationship between spouses is severed by divorce, property shared during the marriage must be divided. Agreements regarding property division made before or during the marriage are recognized by courts, as well as settlement agreements entered into at the time of divorce. If the spouses cannot agree, state law varies on whether a judge must divide the property evenly or in another manner to achieve fairness. Knowing what is considered marital property and understanding the laws regarding property division will help you better prepare for the divorce process.

Marital Property Laws in Ohio

Couples who decide to divorce often wonder how their property will be split, or how much say they have in the matter. The answers to these questions depend, in large part, on where you live and the character of the property in question. Ohio is an equitable distribution state, meaning that courts split your marital property in a manner that is intended to be fair and just, based on factors set forth in state law.

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