How to Obtain a Divorce Decree From California

by Anna Assad
    The county court that issued your divorce should have a copy of the decree.

    The county court that issued your divorce should have a copy of the decree.

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    A divorce decree, the final order from the court that officially ended the marriage, is needed for various reasons, such as to verify the divorce terms and to prove the divorce is final. Losing the original divorce decree makes proving the divorce terms or end of the marriage more difficult. Either former spouse has the right to get a certified — or official — copy of the divorce decree from the California county superior court that issued the decree.

    Step 1

    Visit the California county superior court that issued the divorce decree. Bring your photo identification, such as a valid state license or passport.

    Step 2

    Tell the court clerk you need a certified copy of the divorce decree, and ask for a copy request form. Though the forms vary by county, you typically need the following information: the names of both parties to the divorce, the date the divorce was filed, and the date the decree was issued. Sign and date the form. Give the form and your identification to the court clerk.

    Step 3

    Pay the clerk the fee for the copy. Fees vary by California county. Keep the divorce decree in a safe place.

    Tips & Warnings

    • The superior court might have other options, such as ordering by mail or online. Options for decree retrieval vary by California county.
    • Call the superior court if your divorce is older; the file might be in storage. You may need to ask for document retrieval before you go to the court to get the decree.

    About the Author

    Anna Assad began writing professionally in 1999 and has published several legal articles for various websites. She has an extensive real estate and criminal legal background. She also tutored in English for nearly eight years, attended Buffalo State College for paralegal studies and accounting, and minored in English literature, receiving a Bachelor of Arts.

    Photo Credits

    • Comstock/Comstock/Getty Images