How to Remarry Your Ex After Another Divorce

By Robin Elizabeth Margolis

If you divorced your spouse, married another person, divorced that person, and now want to remarry your first ex-spouse, state divorce laws allow you to do this. You will need to legally cancel or reverse many of the arrangements made after your original divorce.

If you divorced your spouse, married another person, divorced that person, and now want to remarry your first ex-spouse, state divorce laws allow you to do this. You will need to legally cancel or reverse many of the arrangements made after your original divorce.

Step 1

Review the divorce paperwork for your past marriage to the ex-spouse you plan to remarry, and the paperwork for your divorce from your other ex-spouse. If the paperwork for either divorce is incomplete, you may still be married to that spouse.

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Step 2

If you're concerned with past issues, consider reading the pioneering research on lovers and spouses who reunited by Dr. Nancy Kalish, a clinical psychologist, as described in her book, "Lost & Found Lovers: Facts and Fantasies of Rekindled Romances." Discuss this research with your ex-spouse, as it may help you avoid reunion problems.

Step 3

Visit a therapist with your ex-spouse and discuss the issues that broke up your first marriage to each other. The American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy can help you find a trained couples counselor.

Step 4

Contact the staff of the social service agencies and state courts that oversee your alimony, child custody and child support arrangements with your ex-spouse and ask what procedures you need to follow to have your post-divorce arrangements terminated. The National Center for State Courts maintains links to each state's family courts on its website.

Step 5

Discuss with your ex-spouse whether you will go back on your ex-spouse's health insurance policy or your ex-spouse will sign up for your health insurance plan after the remarriage. Call the health insurance company for the necessary forms.

Step 6

Contact the Social Security Administration and ask the staff person you speak with how remarriage to your ex-spouse will affect Social Security payments made to both you and your ex-spouse.

Step 7

Consider drawing up a prenuptial agreement to protect your finances in the event that you divorce again. Revise your estate planning documents, including your will, to reflect the fact that you will be remarrying your ex-spouse.

Step 8

Review your state's requirements for a marriage license. You will likely have to bring documentary proof that you are legally divorced from both your ex-spouse and your most recent spouse. Once you obtain the marriage license, you are free to remarry your ex-spouse.

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Can You Legally Remarry Your Ex-Wife?

References

Resources

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