How to Renew a Patent

By Brenna Davis

Patents granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office are designed to encourage discovery and invention by granting exclusive rights to reproduce or sell an invention or design for a period of time. You must pay maintenance fees to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to maintain your patent for the full period.

Patents granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office are designed to encourage discovery and invention by granting exclusive rights to reproduce or sell an invention or design for a period of time. You must pay maintenance fees to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to maintain your patent for the full period.

Patent Expiration

Plant patents and utility patents last up to 20 years from the date of application, while patents for designs last up to 14 years from the date of application. Plant and utility patents granted prior to 1995 last 17 years. When your patent expires, you no longer have exclusive rights to manufacture and sell the product. For example, generic drugs can be manufactured and sold after a drug patent expires. An expired patent can only be renewed through an act of Congress, and in rare cases, a patent may be extended for a few years.

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Maintenance Fees

Patent holders must pay maintenance fees to the USPTO at certain intervals after the patent is approved to maintain it for the full allowable period. Your renewal fees must be paid 3.5, 7.5 and 11.5 years after the patent is granted. Note, that these intervals are based on when the patent was granted even though the expiration date is based on when the patent application was received. Renewal fees will depend on when the patent was granted and can be paid at the USPTO website up to six months in advance of the due date. If you do not pay the maintenance fees, the patent will expire. However, if the patent expires due to nonpayment, and you can demonstrate that the nonpayment was unintentional, you can pay the fees and reinstate the patent up to two years after its expiration. Maintenance fees are not required while a patent application is pending, even if the application is pending for several years.

Drug Patent Renewal

Drug patents are among the rare patents occasionally renewed by Congress. To qualify for this renewal, a drug manufacturer must demonstrate that there was an extended wait for the drug to be approved for distribution and consumption. If this period interfered with the manufacturer's ability to profit off of the patent, and if the drug is viewed as a public good, the patent may be extended for a few years. Patent maintenance fees must still be paid during this time, and when this time period ends, the patent is permanently expired.

Patent Extensions

If there is an extended delay in the patenting process, you may be able to extend the life of your patent for a brief period. The USPTO offers extensions if the office itself unnecessarily delays the process, if the patent is not approved within three years of the original application or if the delay was caused by two people trying to patent the same item at the same time. These extensions are not automatic and are granted very rarely. You will need the assistance of a patent attorney to determine if your patent can be extended, and the wait for approval can take several months or years. Thus, if you feel there was a delay in your patent approval, you should seek an extension prior to the expiration of your patent.

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What Does Expired for Non-Payment Mean for Patents?

References

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How to Calculate Patent Expiration

In the U.S., patent protections generally stay in force for twenty years, but the date on which this protection begins may vary. Once a patent expires, the invention may be freely copied, so knowing how to calculate patent expiration can be a valuable skill. In order to calculate patent expiration, you will need to know what kind of patent is involved and when its protection began.

What Happens to a Patent When it Expires?

A patent allows you, and only you, to profit from your genius when you invent something new. No one else can manufacture or sell your invention unless you give permission. However, this protection does not last forever. Depending on what you’ve invented, your patent will expire in either 14 or 20 years. When this occurs, anyone can copy your idea and market it. When a patent expires, the protection it offers ceases to exist.

What Does Patent Mean?

A patent is a legal monopoly on the use and benefit of a unique invention. Patent rights are granted by national governments after a lengthy application and examination process. The patent holder may be the inventor or, as in the case of a work for hire, the inventor’s employer. In the U.S., patents are granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

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