How to Stop a Power of Attorney

By Anna Assad

You can stop a power of attorney you granted to another person by completing a revocation form, and you must do so as soon as possible to prevent the person from acting on your behalf. A power of attorney allows one person, the agent, to act in place of another person, the principal, in various matters, including bank and real estate transactions.

You can stop a power of attorney you granted to another person by completing a revocation form, and you must do so as soon as possible to prevent the person from acting on your behalf. A power of attorney allows one person, the agent, to act in place of another person, the principal, in various matters, including bank and real estate transactions.

Step 1

Visit a legal website or office supply store to get a power of attorney revocation form for your state.

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Step 2

Complete the form. Forms vary by state, but you typically need the date the power of attorney went info effect and the name of the agent. The form already contains a statement indicating the power of attorney is terminated in accordance with your state's required wording. Sign and date the form and have your signature notarized.

Step 3

Make copies of the form. You need a copy for the agent and a copy for each place the power of attorney was on file, such as your bank and the IRS. Send the form copies to the agent and all places the power of attorney was on file by certified mail, return receipt requested. Keep the original revocation and mail receipts in a safe place.

Step 4

Ask the agent for the original power of attorney back, if possible. Destroy the document.

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How to File a Revocation of a Power of Attorney

References

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