How to Write a Will for an Unborn Child

By Heather Frances J.D.

You can use a will to accomplish many purposes, including naming guardians for your children, leaving specific bequests to your loved ones and nominating someone to manage your estate until it can be distributed. Though it is typically wise to update your will as your circumstances change, you can include provisions for your unborn children as well as living family members.

You can use a will to accomplish many purposes, including naming guardians for your children, leaving specific bequests to your loved ones and nominating someone to manage your estate until it can be distributed. Though it is typically wise to update your will as your circumstances change, you can include provisions for your unborn children as well as living family members.

Writing Your Will

You can write a will to say almost anything, but it is important to be clear with your wording. If the people you leave behind don't understand what you meant, they can't use your will to properly distribute your property. They may have to rely on a judge to interpret your will if it is unclear. Thus, your will must clearly state that you intend to leave certain bequests to your unborn child. Wills often include gifts to categories of people, such as all of the writer's children, but this may not be clear enough. Instead, you may wish to include a statement that defines children as both your existing children and any children you may hereafter have.

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Complying With State Law

State laws may vary in this area, and your state may require certain specific language to ensure your gift is distributed properly. Previously decided court cases in your state may help you or your attorney craft a will to meet your specific needs by looking at how courts have interpreted certain phrases and wording in the past. Wills also must be executed, or signed, in accordance with your state's laws. If you fail to meet your state's basic requirements, your entire will could be declared invalid by a probate court after your death.

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How To Create a Will In 3 Steps

References

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Is a Handwritten Will Legal in Washington State?

A will contains your last wishes, directions for the distribution of your property to your loved ones and the name of your executor, the person who will oversee your estate after your death. You may type or write out your will by hand in Washington, but all of the requirements under state law must be met.

Last Will & Testament Mistakes

A will is usually the foundation of an estate plan. However, if your will is poorly drafted, improperly executed or out-of-date, it may not provide the protection or direction you want. Drafting and signing formalities vary by jurisdiction, and what is proper in one state might not achieve the same results in another. You can avoid mistakes by consulting an attorney or online legal document provider.

How to Write an Attachment to an Estate Will

You don't need to start from scratch to make changes to your will. You can modify your will by simply attaching new directions to it. You can also attach a list identifying your personal belongings and to whom you are leaving them. Each state has its owns laws regarding estate planning, and an attorney can answer specific questions about attachments to your will.

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