How to Get a Certified Copy of Your Divorce Decree in Wisconsin

By Anna Assad

Unlike a divorce certificate, a divorce decree has more detailed information regarding the terms of your divorce, such as property settlements and child custody arrangements. You can get a certified copy of your decree from the issuing Wisconsin court. The certified decree contains the court's official stamp, indicating the decree matches the papers the court has on file for your case. You'll have to visit the court in person to obtain your certified divorce decree.

Step 1

Call the Wisconsin circuit court clerk's office of the family division that granted your divorce. Tell them you need a certified copy of your divorce decree and ask when you can pick it up. It is helpful if you have your case number. Ask what the identification requirements are to obtain your certified divorce decree. Requirements vary by court, but acceptable forms include your state driver's license and your birth certificate. Inquire as to the applicable fee for a certified copy.

Step 2

Visit the Wisconsin circuit court clerk's office. Bring the required identification with you. Ask for a certified copy of your divorce decree. Follow the clerk's instructions. You may have to sign a short form.

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Step 3

Pay the fee. Take the certified copy of the decree the clerk gives you.

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How to Apply for a Divorce Decree Document
 

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