Is Counseling Required to Divorce in Georgia?

By Wayne Thomas

Marriage counseling can be helpful to some couples attempting to reconcile and avoid divorce. In Georgia, while a couple may choose to voluntarily attend counseling, state law does not require it as a prerequisite to divorce. However, once a divorce has been filed, the court can order the couple to work with a mediator in an attempt to come to an agreement on the major issues related to their divorce.

Counseling Not Required

Georgia law provides a no-fault option for divorce. This means that one spouse can obtain a divorce over the protest of the other spouse by simply attesting that the marriage is "irretrievably broken." For that reason, counseling aimed at saving the marriage is never required. However, if the couple has children under the age of 18, the parents are required to attend parenting classes to minimize disruption of the children's lives during and after the divorce. Further, mediation may be ordered to encourage settlement and avoid trial on issues related to property division, child custody and support, and spousal support.

Divorce is never easy, but we can help. Learn More
Is It Legal to Get Married the Same Day You Get Divorced?

References

Related articles

How to Become a Divorce Mediator

Unlike divorce attorneys, who represent one party in a divorce proceeding, divorce mediators work with the husband and wife to help them negotiate an agreement that is satisfactory to both parties. A divorce mediator helps the couple come to an agreement regarding issues including child custody and division of property before the divorce is filed in court. This means that the divorce can move more quickly through the court system. While there is no uniform licensing requirement for divorce mediators, many have college background or have completed a formal training program, according to StateUniversity.com, a career resources website.

Do You Have to Wait 6 Months Before You Can File for a Divorce in Illinois?

In some states, grounds for divorce are pretty straightforward – you have irreconcilable differences, and that's that. Illinois recognizes irreconcilable differences as a ground, but that's where the simplicity ends. A six-month rule applies in this state, although there's no waiting period if you file on fault grounds.

What Is a Pending Divorce?

A divorce goes through many stages, starting from the first serious issues arising between a couple and terminating in the final divorce decree issued by the court. A pending divorce generally refers to the intermediate stage after the divorce papers have been filed and before the court has issued judgment.

Get Divorced Online

Related articles

Uncontested Divorce in Illinois

While cooperating and communicating with your spouse during divorce proceedings may be challenging, it can allow you to ...

90 Day Cooling Off Period for a Divorce in Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania requires a 90-day "cooling off" period for no-fault or "mutual consent" divorces, which provides an ...

Is a Sexless Marriage Grounds for a Divorce in Georgia?

For most couples, the marriage relationship includes some physical intimacy. However, in Georgia, sexual intercourse is ...

How Long It Takes for an Uncontested Divorce to Be Final in New York

Disagreement between spouses usually is a major catalyst for divorce. Once the decision to end a marriage is made, if a ...

Browse by category
Ready to Begin? GET STARTED