What to Expect at a Dissolution Hearing

By Beverly Bird

By the time you've worked your way through the divorce process and it's almost over, you probably feel like an old pro. You might even find yourself giving advice to your friends. Then you realize you have one more hurdle. You can't get a divorce – called a dissolution in some states – until you attend a final hearing. There are two types of dissolution hearings.

Uncontested Hearings

If you and your spouse agree on all the terms of your divorce, the dissolution is uncontested. The final hearing is often a simple matter of presenting your written and signed agreement. The judge might ask you some questions about its terms, like support and custody, and make sure you entered into it willingly. In some states, no hearing is required to get a final decree in an uncontested divorce – you just file your agreement with the court and the judge reviews and signs it.

Trials

Contested divorces result in trials. Your dissolution is contested if there's even one issue you and your spouse can't agree on. You must present evidence in court to convince the judge to rule your way. If you have a lawyer, he'll do this for you, but you may have to testify to explain some details. Both your attorney and your spouse's lawyer will question you. Sometimes the judge makes a decision right then, but if many issues are in dispute, he will probably take some time to issue a written decision – and a dissolution decree – at a later date.

Divorce is never easy, but we can help. Learn More
Divorce is never easy, but we can help. Learn More
Florida Contested Divorce Procedures

References

Related articles

What Is a Stipulated Divorce Hearing?

In a stipulated divorce hearing, a judge reviews a divorce settlement and decides whether to approve it. Some states refer to a stipulated divorce hearing as an uncontested divorce hearing. The word "stipulated" means that the parties agree on the facts and agree that the court can rely on those facts in deciding the case. For many divorcing couples, a stipulated divorce hearing plays an important role in bringing their marriage to a close.

Do You Have to Go to Court Before a Dissolution of Marriage Is Finalized?

The thought of having to appear in court for any reason is enough to give most people cold feet. In the case of divorce -- called dissolution in some states -- the necessity for court appearances depends on where you live and the nature of your proceedings. State laws dictate whether you must go to court and appear before a judge. The details of your divorce determine whether your appearance will be a quick formality or a long drawn-out affair.

Do You Have to Go to Court When Divorce Is Final in Tennessee?

If your divorce is contested, you can count on appearing in court, maybe even more than once, for both temporary hearings and a trial. Uncontested divorces are a different matter. If you and your spouse have a signed marital settlement agreement, or if your spouse doesn't involve himself in the divorce at all, your matter is uncontested. If anyone has to go to court, it would be you if you began the proceedings by filing the complaint. However, in some Tennessee counties, your appearance may not be necessary to finalize your case.

Get Divorced Online

Related articles

How to Get a Non-Contested Divorce in Illinois

An uncontested, or non-contested, divorce is typically considered the easiest way to end your marriage. It's less ...

Does Someone Have to Be at the Divorce Court Date in North Carolina?

In some respects, North Carolina is the easiest state in which to divorce. You don't have to divide your property or ...

How Long Does Divorce Take in Michigan if You Have No Children?

Establishing custody and support for a minor child can be a time-consuming aspect of the divorce process. These matters ...

What Will Happen Once My Wife Has Filed for Divorce?

When your wife files for divorce, you'll probably hear from a lot of well-meaning friends who have been through it ...

Browse by category
Ready to Begin? GET STARTED