How to Make Your Will Legal in Indiana

By A.L. Kennedy

Your will is a document that explains how to distribute some or all of your property when you die. Wills written in Indiana are governed by the Indiana Probate Code, which is found at Title 29 of the Indiana Code. The Indiana Probate Code gives specific instructions about how to write a will so that it will be recognized as valid and legal by an Indiana Court. You will need to meet several requirements to have a valid Indiana will. You can write your own valid will, but consulting a lawyer for more complicated estates is advisable to ensure compliance with state law.

Step 1

Put your will in writing. You may write your will by hand or type it, and you may use either a blank piece of paper or a preprinted will form.

Step 2

Sign your will in the presence of at least two witnesses and put the day, month and year next to your signature. Have each witness sign your will beneath your signature. Each witness should also put the day, month and year beside his signature.

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Step 3

Have your will notarized. The notary should watch you and each of your witnesses sign and date the will. Beneath your signature and your witnesses's signatures, the notary should put the language required for a self-proving clause in Indiana Code 29-1-5-3.1, then notarize the will.

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