How to Stop a Power of Attorney

By Anna Assad

You can stop a power of attorney you granted to another person by completing a revocation form, and you must do so as soon as possible to prevent the person from acting on your behalf. A power of attorney allows one person, the agent, to act in place of another person, the principal, in various matters, including bank and real estate transactions.

Step 1

Visit a legal website or office supply store to get a power of attorney revocation form for your state.

Step 2

Complete the form. Forms vary by state, but you typically need the date the power of attorney went info effect and the name of the agent. The form already contains a statement indicating the power of attorney is terminated in accordance with your state's required wording. Sign and date the form and have your signature notarized.

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Step 3

Make copies of the form. You need a copy for the agent and a copy for each place the power of attorney was on file, such as your bank and the IRS. Send the form copies to the agent and all places the power of attorney was on file by certified mail, return receipt requested. Keep the original revocation and mail receipts in a safe place.

Step 4

Ask the agent for the original power of attorney back, if possible. Destroy the document.

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How to Get a Power of Attorney Dropped
 

References

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How to Create a Temporary Power of Attorney

Under certain circumstances you may need to authorize someone else to perform legal acts on your behalf. Under these circumstances, you may execute a power of attorney in favor of an agent -- also known as an "attorney-in-fact." "Fill in the blanks" power of attorney forms are available from banks and hospitals and on state government websites. While you can draft your own power of attorney, a form can serve as a guide for what to include and how to word your POA to avoid legal risks.

How to Fill Out a General Power of Attorney

You must fill out a general power of attorney correctly. If you make mistakes, you might give your agent powers you don't want her to have, omit powers you do want to give her or end up with a useless document. You are the principal, the person giving authority, and your agent is the person you're allowing to act in your place. A general power of attorney allows your agent to act for you in various matters, including bank transactions and property sales. You can get a fill-in general power of attorney form at an office supply store or legal document store in your area. The fill-in form already has all the words your state requires for a valid power of attorney.

How to Obtain Power of Attorney in Indiana

A power of attorney is a powerful legal device that allows a person, known as the principal, to delegate the power to perform legal acts on his behalf to you, the agent. The principal may authorize you to perform any legal act that he is entitled to perform himself, or he may authorize you to perform a specific task, such as paying his bills while he is ill. Indiana state law governs the form, content and effects of a power of attorney executed by a principal who is an Indiana resident.

Power of Attorney

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